Economics · Personal Finance

A Christmas Carol Is a Lesson in Opportunity Cost

Opportunity cost is the how you would spend your time or money if you chose your favorite alternative to the choice you are making. For example, I am tempted to add the extra sports package to my Sling TV account, but it costs an additional $11 per month. $11 doesn’t seem like much, but if put into my retirement account instead, $11 per month is $6,000-8,000 in future value. Using the 4% rule, that’s about $300 in future annual income, or about $25 per month in retirement income. So an $11 per month now costs me $25 per month later. That’s a heavy opportunity cost that one might not consider before making a seemingly small financial decision.

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Book Reviews

Book Review: On Borrowed Time

On Borrowed Time is a both comprehensive and concise study of the economics of mined resources and their related commodities. It is the perfect resource for anyone interested in investing or working in these commodities or their related industries or getting a better handle on how to interpret physical and economic measures of resource availability.

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Book Reviews

Book Review: Meltdown by Chris Clearfield

Meltdown (Clearfield)Our society increasingly relies on complex, tightly coupled systems that handle our healthcare, finances, travel, and more. While those systems can be more productive and theoretically safer, they have vulnerabilities, including the complexity in itself. Sometimes, the addition of more safety features can actually make something less safe by making it more complex and therefore more likely to allow for a mistake to be made. Continue reading “Book Review: Meltdown by Chris Clearfield”

Economics · Essays

The Constitutional Case for the EPA

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There has been a lot of attention around President Trump’s director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Scott Pruitt. It was clear when Pruitt was appointed that the Trump administration was not taking environmental protection seriously. Pruitt has proved this assumption right by spending taxpayer money frivolously as well as using his post to help his wife find a job. While the Obama administration took the EPA’s responsibilities more seriously than this administration, it had its own share of failures, including taking 10 months to act on information that the city of Flint was not properly treating its water to prevent toxic lead contamination. The EPA has needed better direction for a long time. Let’s explore why that is so important. Continue reading “The Constitutional Case for the EPA”